Formal Agency-Wide QI

Executives and senior leaders hold staff accountable to expectations related to performance management and QI. This commitment is demonstrated by the dedication of sufficient financial and human resources to training, infrastructure, and support for collecting, monitoring, reporting, and improving individual, team, and organizational performance. Most staff value QI as a strategy for improving their work. QI is incorporated into job descriptions, employee orientation, and the performance appraisal process. Formal QI teams are formed on a regular basis, and the results of these efforts are consistently disseminated. As a result, processes are becoming clearly defined, efficient, effective, and standardized across the organization. A formal process for implementing, monitoring, and evaluating the QI plan is in place. Performance measures are linked to strategic goals. All teams have performance management plans, including data collection, analysis, and reporting and a centralized system for storing and accessing that data exists. Problem solving and decision making are driven by data.

Characteristics

  • Employees with necessary KSAs to complete formal QI projects exist in all areas of the agency.
  • An inventory of internal and external QI trainings and resources (basic and advanced) are available to all staff.
  • Employees are incentivized to engage in QI initiatives through both non-financial and financial rewards (e.g. bonus, promotions), as feasible
  • Most employees fully embrace QI and view it as a valuable tool to improve their work.
  • Employees use performance measures and data to identify and implement improvements to their own work.
  • Employees understand how they contribute to the agency’s overall mission, vision, and strategy.

Transition Strategies

  • Leaders and managers incorporate QI competencies in position descriptions.
  • Leaders and managers incorporate QI into performance-appraisal process.
  • Hold every level of staff accountable to identifying QI opportunities aligned with agency strategic plan and improving quality in own work processes.

Characteristics

  • Informal groups of employees from various parts of the agency are commonly formed for problem solving and innovation.
  • Formal QI project teams are formed throughout the agency.
  • Several formal methods for peer sharing and learning exist within the agency (e.g. learning community, storyboards, lunch & lunch).
  • Best practices and QI successes are applied and translated from one part of the agency to another.

Transition Strategies

  • PM/QI Council continues to sponsor multiple QI teams across divisions and programs to implement QI efforts.
  • Staff routinely form sharing sessions or use other mechanisms to exchange successes and lessons-learned.

Characteristics

  • Executive leaders and middle managers throughout the agency hold staff accountable to engaging in QI.
  • All leaders are knowledgeable about QI and quality principles, and are able to support staff around QI initiatives.
  • Executive leaders dedicate sufficient staff time and resources to reaching agency QI goals.
  • Leaders engage in QI initiatives and role model the level of engagement expected of staff.
  • Leaders address staff resistance or other barriers to QI on an ongoing basis.

Transition Strategies

  • Leaders continue to update employees and stakeholders on progress and future plans, dedicate resources to QI, and assess agency culture and sustainability of progress.
  • Leaders continue to role model QI behavior and values with employees, customers, and partners.
  • Select new organization leaders that exhibit QI values and dedication to continually improve.

Characteristics

  • Employees are empowered to take corrective action against customer dissatisfaction.
  • Evidence exists that the agency consistently meets internal and external customer needs.
  • Customer satisfaction performance standards and measures are standard throughout the agency, as appropriate.
  • Customer satisfaction data is actively used to improve performance.

Transition Strategies

  • Continue to monitor, assess, improve, and report on customer satisfaction for all programs and services.
  • Refine and improve the customer-satisfaction measurement process.
  • Involve both internal and external customers in improvement activities.
  • Use customer data to define new offerings and services.
  • Incorporate customer feedback into performance appraisal process.

Characteristics

  • An agency QI policy may exist.
  • A formal process for implementing, monitoring, and evaluating a QI plan is in place.
  • The PM/QI Council oversees all QI/PM initiatives, ensures sustainability of successes achieved, and takes necessary action to address barriers among quality initiatives.
  • A formal process for developing and revising performance measures that are linked to program, department, and agency strategic goals is implemented agency-wide.
  • All programs, departments, or divisions have clearly defined plans for performance data collection, analysis, and reporting against pre-defined objectives and standards.
  • A centralized information system for storing and accessing performance data allows for user-friendly performance monitoring and reporting.
  • Agency and department level decisions are always data driven. Performance data is used to identify agency QI projects.

Transition Strategies

  • All staff in all divisions and program areas continue to collect, monitor, analyze, and report performance data.
  • PM/QI Council uses performance data to identify and recommend QI efforts throughout the organization.
  • PM/QI Council continuously assesses progress against QI plan and revises annually.
  • Leaders routinely measure return on investment using cost and benefit values.

Characteristics

  • Formal QI projects are being implemented to improve processes in all departments and divisions of the agency.
  • Formal QI projects result in documented process improvements and monitored for sustainability. Improved processes are standardized and adopted agency-wide.
  • Basic and advanced QI tools and techniques are commonly used for informal problem solving and formal QI projects.
  • Reliable performance data is consistently used to assess for performance gaps, and identify and implement QI projects.
  • Many agency-wide processes are clearly defined, efficient, and standardized throughout agency.

Transition Strategies

  • Continue to hold improvement gains resulting from previous QI efforts.
  • PM/Council continues to sponsor QI projects, as appropriate.
  • Staff continue to use, and contribute to, evidence base and model practices.